Disruptive, Impulse-Control, and Conduct Disorders
 

antisocial personality disorder, conduct disorder, intermittent explosive disorder, kleptomania, oppositional defiant disorder, and pyromania

 

DSM-5 recognizes six different disorders as being in the category of Disruptive, Impulse-Control, and Conduct Disorders: antisocial personality disorder, conduct disorder, intermittent explosive disorder, kleptomania, oppositional defiant disorder, and pyromania.

 

Antisocial Personality Disorder Scale

 

There is a 7-item Antisocial Personality Disorder subscale in the following Checkmate Plus Symptom Inventories:

 

  • Adolescent Symptom Inventory (middle school, junior & senior high school)

  • Adult Inventories (adults)

 

The Antisocial Personality Disorder subscale of Checkmate Plus Symptom Inventories is reported on in a number of scientific publications, representative examples of which are Byrd, Manuck, Hawes, et al., 2006; Chien, Gau, & Gadow, 2011; Dunn, Austin, & Perkins, 2009; Konikkou, Kostantinou, & Fanti, 2020; and Kyranides, Fanti, Sikki, & Patrick, 2017. Abstracts of these and other studies can be accessed by clicking the link to Research Bibliography.

Conduct Disorder Scale

 

There is a 10-to-15 item (depending on age) Conduct Disorder subscale in the following Checkmate Plus Symptom Inventories:

 

  • Early Childhood Inventory (early childhood)

  • Child Symptom Inventory (elementary school)

  • Adolescent Symptom Inventory (secondary school)

  • Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory (elementary & secondary school)

  • Youth’s (Self Report) Inventory (secondary school)

  • Adult Inventories (adults)

 

The Conduct Disorder subscale of Checkmate Plus Symptom Inventories is reported on in hundreds of scientific publications, representative examples of which are Bachanas, Morris, Lewis-Gess, et al., 2002; Drabick, Beauchaine, Gadow, et al., 2006; Fanti & Lordos, 2020; Guttmann-Steinmetz, Gadow, & DeVincent, 2009; Loeber, Stepp, Chung, et al., 2010; Osigwe, Gadow, Nachman, & Drabick, 2020; and Roberts, McCrory, Bird, et al., 2020. Abstracts of these and other studies can be accessed by clicking the link to Research Bibliography.

Conduct Disorder with Limited Prosocial Emotions Scale

There is a 4-item Limited Prosocial Emotions subscale in the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory (elementary & secondary school).

Intermittent Explosive Disorder Item

There is one key symptom of intermittent explosive disorder in Checkmate Plus Adult Inventories.

Kleptomania Item

There is one key symptom of kleptomania in Checkmate Plus Adult Inventories.

 

 

Oppositional Defiant Disorder Scale

 

Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is one of the more common psychiatric disorders and typically co-occurs with AD/HD.

 

The 8-item Oppositional Defiant Disorder subscale appears in all Checkmate Plus Symptom Inventories.

 

  • Early Childhood Inventory (early childhood)

  • Child Symptom Inventory (elementary school)

  • Adolescent Symptom Inventory (secondary school)

  • Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory (elementary & secondary school)

  • Youth’s (Self Report) Inventory (secondary school)

  • Adult Inventories (adults)

 

  • ADHD Symptom Checklist (children and adolescents)

  • ADHD School Observation Code (elementary school)

 

The ODD subscale of Checkmate Plus Symptom Inventories is reported on in hundreds of scientific publications, representative examples of which are Drabick, Beauchaine, Gadow, et al., 2006; Drabick, Gadow, and Loney, 2007, 2008; Drabick and Gadow, 2012; Gadow, DeVincent, and Drabick, 2008; Gadow, Nolan, Sverd, et al., 2008; Guttmann-Steinmetz, Gadow, and DeVincent, 2009; and Osigwe, Gadow, Nachman, and Drabick, 2020. Abstracts of these and other studies can be accessed by clicking the link to Research Bibliography.

 

            There are also empirically derived subscales and empirically generated scoring algorithms for ODD generated from the Symptom Inventories (Drabick and Gadow, 2012).

 

Pyromania Item

 

The Conduct Disorder subscale appears in all Checkmate Plus Symptom Inventories and includes an item that refers to fire setting. In addition, there is one key symptom of pyromania in the Adult Inventories.

ADHD SYMPTOM CHECKLIST-4

The ADHD Symptom Checklist-4 (ADHD-SC4) is a 50-item rating scale for evaluating response to treatment in children and adolescents with AD/HD (ages 3 to 18 years). The same version can be completed by parents and teachers. The ADHD-SC4 comprises four subscales: DSM-5 symptoms of AD/HD; DSM-5 symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD); the Peer Conflict Scale, which measures interpersonal peer aggression; and the Stimulant Side Effects Checklist (to monitor medication). The ADHD Symptom Checklist-4 or its subscales are reported on in scores of scientific publications, representative examples of which are Angello, Volpe, DiPerna, et al., 2003; Block, 1998; Gadow, Arnold, Molina, et al., 2014; Pfiffner, Hinshaw, Owens, et al., 2014; Ogg, Rogers, and Volpe, 2020; and Pelham, Fabiano, and Massetti, 2005. Abstracts of these and other studies can be accessed by clicking the link to Research Bibliography.

 

CHILD & ADOLESCENT SYMPTOM INVENTORY-PROGRESS MONITOR

 

The Child & Adolescent Symptom Inventory-Progress Monitor (CASI-PM) is a brief behavior rating scale for DSM-5 emotional and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents between 3 and 18 years old. It was developed to monitor the progress over time and to assess changes in symptoms as a function of intervention. There are both parent (29 items) and teacher (30 items) versions of the CASI-PM. The CASI-PM contains a subset of the common items from Early Childhood Inventory-5 (ECI-5) and the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-5 (CASI-5), which makes it an ideal progress monitor for qualified professionals who use these diagnostic measures. It assesses symptoms of ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and depression. The CASI-PM also assess functional impairment (i.e., the degree to which symptoms interfere with social or academic functioning).

 

The Child & Adolescent Symptom Inventory-Progress Monitor is reported on in scientific publications, representative examples of which are Dart, Arora, Collins, and Doll, 2019; Mpango, Ssembajjwe, Muyingo, Gadow, et al., 2019; and Lavigne, Cromley, Sprafkin, and Gadow, 2009. Abstracts of these and other studies can be accessed by clicking the link to Research Bibliography.

 

 

REFERENCES

            Angello, L.M., Volpe, R.J., DiPerna, J.C., Gureasko-Moore, S.P., Gureasko-Moore, D.P., Nebrig, M.R., & Ota, K. (2003). Assessment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: An evaluation of six published rating scales. School Psychology Review, 32, 241-262. doi: 10.1080/02796015.2003.12086196

            Angello, L.M., Volpe, R.J., DiPerna, J.C., Gureasko-Moore, S.P., Gureasko-Moore, D.P., Nebrig, M.R., & Ota, K. (2003). Assessment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: An evaluation of six published rating scales. School Psychology Review, 32, 241-262. doi: 10.1080/02796015.2003.12086196

            Bachanas, P.J., Morris, M.K., Lewis-Gess, J.K., Sarett-Cuasay, E.J., Flores, A.L., Sirl, K.S., & Sawyer, M.K. (2002). Psychological adjustment, substance use, HIV knowledge, and risky sexual behavior in at-risk minority females: Developmental differences during adolescence. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 27, 373-384. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/27.4.373

            Block, S.L. (1998). Attention-deficit disorder: A paradigm for psychotropic medication intervention in pediatrics. Pediatric Clinics of North America, 45, 1053-1083. doi: 10.1016/s0031-3955(05)70062-6

            Byrd, A.L., Manuck, S.B., Hawes, S.W., Vebares, T.J., Nimgaonkar, V., Chowdari, K.V., Hipwell, A.E., Keenan, K., & Stepp, S.D. (2019). The interaction between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and childhood maltreatment as a predictor of personality pathology in females: Emotional reactivity as a potential mediating mechanism. Development and Psychopathology, 31(1), 361-377. doi: 10.1017/S0954579417001900

            Chien, Y.L., Gau, S.S.F., & Gadow, K.D. (2011). Sex difference in the rates and co-occurring conditions of psychiatric symptoms in incoming college students in Taiwan. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 52, 195-207. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.03.009 

            Dart, E.H., Arora, P.G., Collins, T.A., & Doll, B. (2019). Progress monitoring measures for internalizing symptoms: a systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature. School Mental Health, 11(2), 265-275. doi: 10.1007/s12310-018-9299-7

            Drabick, D.A.G., Gadow, K.D., & Loney, J. (2007). Source-specific oppositional defiant disorder: Comorbidity and risk factors in referred elementary school boys. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 46, 92-101. doi: 10.1097/01.chi.0000242245.00174.90

            Drabick, D.A.G., Gadow, K.D., & Loney, J. (2008). Co-occurring ODD and GAD symptom groups: Source-specific syndromes and cross-informant comorbidity. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 37, 314-326. doi: 10.1080/15374410801955862

            Drabick, D.A.G., & Gadow, K.D. (2012). Deconstructing oppositional defiant disorder: Clinic-based evidence for an anger/irritability phenotype. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 51, 384-393. doi: 10.1016/j.jaac.2012.01.010

            Dunn, D. W., Austin, J. K.., & Perkins, S.M. (2009). Prevalence of psychopathology in childhood epilepsy: categorical and dimensional measures. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 51, 364-372. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2008.03172.x

            Fanti, K. A., & Lordos, A. (2020). Age patterns in psychopathic traits from age 9 to age 20: Testing unique associations with conduct disorder symptoms. Current Psychology, Early Access: OCT 2020. doi: 10.1007/s12144-020-01150-z

            Gadow, K.D., Arnold, L.E., Molina, B.S.G., et al. (2014). Risperidone added to parent training + stimulant medication: Effects on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and peer aggression. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 53, 948-959. doi: 10.1016/j.jaac.2014.05.008

            Gadow, K.D., DeVincent, C.J., & Drabick, D.A.G. (2008). Oppositional defiant disorder as a clinical phenotype in children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38, 1302-1310.  doi: 10.1007/s10803-007-0516-8

            Gadow, K.D., Nolan, E.E., Sverd, J., Sprafkin, J., & Schneider, J. (2008). Methylphenidate in children with oppositional defiant disorder and both co-morbid chronic multiple tic disorder and ADHD. Journal of Child Neurology, 23, 981-990. doi. 10.1177/0883073808315412

            Guttmann-Steinmetz, S., Gadow, K.D., & DeVincent, C.J. (2009). Oppositional defiant and conduct disorder behaviors in boys with autism spectrum disorder with and without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder versus several comparison samples. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39, 976-985. doi:10.1007/s10803-009-0706-7

            Konikkou, K., Kostantinou, N., & Fanti, K.A. (2020). Transcranial magnetic stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex affects emotional processing: accounting for individual differences in antisocial behavior. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 16 (3), 349-366. Special Issue: SI. doi: 10.1007/s11292-020-09440-z

            Kyranides, M.N., Fanti, K.A., Sikki, M., & Patrick, C.J.  (2017). Triarchic Dimensions of psychopathy in young adulthood: associations with clinical and physiological measures after accounting for adolescent psychopathic traits. Personality Disorders-Theory Research and Treatment, 8(2), 140-149. doi: 10.1037/per0000193

            Lavigne, J.V., Cromley, T., Sprafkin, J., & Gadow, K.D. (2009). The Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory Progress Monitor: A brief DSM-IV-referenced parent-report scale for children and adolescents. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 19, 241-252. doi: 10.1089/cap.2008.052

            Loeber, R., Stepp, S.D., Chung, T., Hipwell, A.E., & White, H.R. (2010). Time-varying associations between conduct problems and alcohol use in adolescent girls: The moderating role of race. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 71, 544-553. doi: 10.15288/jsad.2010.71.544

   Mpango, R.S., Ssembajjwe, W., Muyingo, S.K., Gadow, K.D., Patel, V., & Kinyanda, E. (2020). Adaptation and validation of a brief DSM-5 based psychiatric rating scale for childhood and adolescent mental health in Uganda: the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-Progress Monitor (CASI-PM). Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies, 15:2, 144-154, doi: 10.1080/17450128.2019.1686672

            Ni, H.C., & Gau, S.S.F.  (2015). Co-occurrence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms with other psychopathology in young adults: parenting style as a moderator. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 57, 85-96. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2014.11.002

            Osigwe, I., Gadow, K.D., Nachman, S., & Drabick, D.A.G. (2020). Symptom profiles of CD and ODD among youth with perinatally acquired HIV. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 45(1), 72-80. doi:10.1093/jpepsy/jsz074

            Ogg, J.A., Rogers, M.A., & Volpe, R.J. (2020). Child ADHD symptoms and parent involvement in education. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 29(12), 3586-3595. doi: 10.1007/s10826-020-01834-x

            Pelham, W.E., Fabiano, G.A., & Massetti, G.M. (2005). Evidence-based assessment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 34, 449-476. DOI: 10.1207/s15374424jccp3403_5

             Pfiffner, L. J., Hinshaw, S. P., Owens, E., Zalecki, C., Kaiser, N. M., Villodas, M., & McBurnett, K. (2014). A two-site randomized clinical trial of integrated psychosocial treatment for ADHD-inattentive type. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 82(6), 1115-1127. doi: 10.1037/a0036887

            Roberts, R., McCrory, E., Bird, G., Sharp, M., Roberts, L., & Viding, E. (2020). Thinking about others' minds: mental state inference in boys with conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Early success July 2020. doi: 10.1007/s10802-020-00664-1